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  1. Quote

    | 4 notes
    If the young lads from the rougher parts of town who are being offered a better outcome are predominantly black or Asian then that’s the kind of patronising, intrusive nanny-state social engineering that I can get right behind. That educational experience was a game-changer for me. It’s very difficult to imagine quite where I’d have ended up if I hadn’t been offered it. And if anyone’s asking me, which they’re not, I think chances like that should be given to a lot more young people. Only then will they get invited to the kind of cocktail parties where they can win the “race to the bottom” game. And every kid deserves to be a winner at something. Michael Moran, discussing John Cherry’s ‘racist’ comments on the prospect of children from ethnic minorities being educated in West Sussex

    (Source: Guardian)

  2. Photo

    | 18 notes
    Susana Adame: The blond ‘Mexican beggar child’ story holds a mirror to US perceptions of race

What do you picture when you hear the words “Mexican beggar child”? Is the child blond? Green-eyed? Does she have light skin?
A Mexican family was recently at the centre of a national controversy over such questions. A young Mexican girl begging for money was photographed by a driver. Child beggars are sadly not an uncommon sight in Mexico – except that in this case, the girl was blond, green-eyed and very light-skinned. Feeling something was “not right” about that particular child, the photographer posted the picture to his Facebook timeline, telling his followers to "spread this photo around". He argued that something was clearly wrong because the girl’s parents “were brown”.
For those who reposted the picture (and there were many – so much so that officials soon interceded) it is indeed apparently an aberration for brown people to give birth to light-skinned kids, rather than a fairly frequent situation in a country with a long history of cultural acceptance of interracial relationships. It’s also apparently not normal to see a blond beggar in a country where poverty is defined by “brownness”. So it was only a sign of good community responsibility that thousands of people were willing to use social media to publicise this oddity. Or so we are to believe.

Read the rest here
Picture: Facebook

    Susana Adame: The blond ‘Mexican beggar child’ story holds a mirror to US perceptions of race

    What do you picture when you hear the words “Mexican beggar child”? Is the child blond? Green-eyed? Does she have light skin?

    A Mexican family was recently at the centre of a national controversy over such questions. A young Mexican girl begging for money was photographed by a driver. Child beggars are sadly not an uncommon sight in Mexico – except that in this case, the girl was blond, green-eyed and very light-skinned. Feeling something was “not right” about that particular child, the photographer posted the picture to his Facebook timeline, telling his followers to "spread this photo around". He argued that something was clearly wrong because the girl’s parents “were brown”.

    For those who reposted the picture (and there were many – so much so that officials soon interceded) it is indeed apparently an aberration for brown people to give birth to light-skinned kids, rather than a fairly frequent situation in a country with a long history of cultural acceptance of interracial relationships. It’s also apparently not normal to see a blond beggar in a country where poverty is defined by “brownness”. So it was only a sign of good community responsibility that thousands of people were willing to use social media to publicise this oddity. Or so we are to believe.

    Read the rest here

    Picture: Facebook

  3. Black mathematicians: the kind of problems they wish didn’t need solving

    | 68 notes

    Check out Jonathan Farley – a professor of mathematics who has received death threats from the KKK and was once wrongly detained on suspicion of being a bank robber – writing on racism in academia.

    John Derbyshire, a columnist for the National Review, wrote an essay last week implying that black people were intellectually inferior to white people: “Only one out of six blacks is smarter than the average white.” Derbyshire pulled these figures from a region near his large intestine.

    One of Derbyshire’s claims, however, is true: that there are no black winners of the Fields medal, the “Nobel prize of mathematics”. According to Derbyshire, this is “civilisationally consequential”. Derbyshire implies that the absence of a black winner means that black people are incapable of genius. In reality, black mathematicians face career-retarding racism that white Fields medallists never encounter. Three stories will suffice to make this point.

    Let us know what you think.

  4. Photo

    | 21 notes
    
The question on many a mind is whether Zimmerman can get a fair trial. But the question plaguing me is why the Trayvon Martins of the world are not afforded a fair trail before execution. Before there was Martin, there was Rodney King and Amadou Diallo and many an unknown victim of prejudice.
As a matter of fact, I became aware of Martin’s murder because someone sent an email to me asking whether his killing was this generation’s "Emmett Till moment". When people ask this question, they are already conceding legal defeat. Till was killed when he was 14 years old in 1955 while visiting Money, Mississippi. Till was from Chicago and didn’t know the ways of the south. He committed the “crime” of flirting with a white woman. He paid for that with his life when he was kidnapped from is grandfather’s home by two armed white men, beaten, tortured, and murdered. His corpse was later found bloated and disfigured in the river. The picture of Till in his casket, famous for being published in Jet magazine with his mother’s permission, garnered national attention. His murderers where put on trail and, as expected, acquitted. Some time later, they confessed to the murder to a journalist once assured that double jeopardy meant they could not be tried again.
I expect much of the same for Martin’s case. I fear that legal pundits will say that the evidence the police bothered to collect is inconclusive, that any potential jury pool has been tainted. And then there is the issue of Florida’s “stand your ground” law absolving people of crimes against those they fear. In 1950s Mississippi, Jim Crow public segregation laws demanded the acquittal of Till’s murderers. In 2012, we have stand your ground and a general acceptance that young black men bring violence upon themselves to shield justice from light and provide cover for those who meet out vigilante justice.

• Pamela Merritt (aka blogger Angry Black Bitch) ponders George Zimmerman’s possible upcoming trial, and the concept of justice
Photograph: Yunus Emre Caylak/Demotix/Corbis

    The question on many a mind is whether Zimmerman can get a fair trial. But the question plaguing me is why the Trayvon Martins of the world are not afforded a fair trail before execution. Before there was Martin, there was Rodney King and Amadou Diallo and many an unknown victim of prejudice.

    As a matter of fact, I became aware of Martin’s murder because someone sent an email to me asking whether his killing was this generation’s "Emmett Till moment". When people ask this question, they are already conceding legal defeat. Till was killed when he was 14 years old in 1955 while visiting Money, Mississippi. Till was from Chicago and didn’t know the ways of the south. He committed the “crime” of flirting with a white woman. He paid for that with his life when he was kidnapped from is grandfather’s home by two armed white men, beaten, tortured, and murdered. His corpse was later found bloated and disfigured in the river. The picture of Till in his casket, famous for being published in Jet magazine with his mother’s permission, garnered national attention. His murderers where put on trail and, as expected, acquitted. Some time later, they confessed to the murder to a journalist once assured that double jeopardy meant they could not be tried again.

    I expect much of the same for Martin’s case. I fear that legal pundits will say that the evidence the police bothered to collect is inconclusive, that any potential jury pool has been tainted. And then there is the issue of Florida’s “stand your ground” law absolving people of crimes against those they fear. In 1950s Mississippi, Jim Crow public segregation laws demanded the acquittal of Till’s murderers. In 2012, we have stand your ground and a general acceptance that young black men bring violence upon themselves to shield justice from light and provide cover for those who meet out vigilante justice.

    • Pamela Merritt (aka blogger Angry Black Bitch) ponders George Zimmerman’s possible upcoming trial, and the concept of justice

    Photograph: Yunus Emre Caylak/Demotix/Corbis

  5. Photo

    | 196 notes
    Photograph: Ric Francis/AP 
On MLK day, one set of data to remember: Almost one in 10 young black men are behind bars.

California spends $47,102 per inmate per year.  It is a national disgrace. The mass incarceration of African-Americans  is the civil rights issue of the day. The statistics are horrific.
One in three African-American boys born in 2001 stands a lifetime risk of going to jail, according to the American Leadership Forum.
In 2007, one in every 15 black children had a parent in prison. According to Ohio State University law professor and author Michelle  Alexander, there are more African-American men in prison, on probation  or on parole in the US now than there were enslaved in 1850.
More here.

    Photograph: Ric Francis/AP

    On MLK day, one set of data to remember: Almost one in 10 young black men are behind bars.

    California spends $47,102 per inmate per year. It is a national disgrace. The mass incarceration of African-Americans is the civil rights issue of the day. The statistics are horrific.

    One in three African-American boys born in 2001 stands a lifetime risk of going to jail, according to the American Leadership Forum.

    In 2007, one in every 15 black children had a parent in prison. According to Ohio State University law professor and author Michelle Alexander, there are more African-American men in prison, on probation or on parole in the US now than there were enslaved in 1850.

    More here.

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